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1948 - Pilgrim Staff - 1949 

Editor-in-Chief Susanne Taub 

Senior Literary Editor Rita Anderson 

Junior Literary Editor Shirley Knight 

Sophomore Literary Editor Jane Hilton 

Business Manager Webster Dyer 

Assistant Business Managers Richard Darsch, 

David Pyle, Suzanne Sharkey, Ellen Mandell, Joan Neri, 
Barbara Palavanchi, Joan Grosser, Howard Penn, Anne 
Hathaway, Jeanette Doten 

Art Editor Virginia Holmes 

r Lorraine Monti 

Assistant Art Editors < Violet Pinto 

( Dalton Pratt 

Candid Camera June Fish 

< Franklin Basset 

Assistant Candid Camera < Beverly Carton 

( Joan Vandini 

School News Barbara Keay 

Assistant School News Louise Gavoni 

Boys' Sports Editor Albert Stewart 

( Richard Weaver 

Assistant Boys' Sports Editors -] Wayne Terry 

( Theodore Walley 

Girls' Sports Editor Virginia Patturelli 

Assistant Girls' Sports Editors Constance Paul 

Jacqueline Boyer 

Senior Features Mar jorie Marois, 

Dolores Brenner, Ruth Wall, Virginia Bourne, Robert Saunders, 
Andree Straker, Frances Halunen 

Senior Quatrains Lars McSorley, 

Audrey Calzolari. Beatrice Gibbs, Carol Nemec, Claire Stratton, 
Sally Krueger, Pauline Schiel 

French Editor Rollene Waterman 

Assistant French Editor Sylvia Corsini 

Latin Editor Joan Thomas 

Assistant Latin Editor Barbara McMahon 

Science— Math Editor Clark Griffith 

Assistant Science — Math Editor John Hebard 

Vocational Editor Lillian Almeida 

Assistant Vocational Editor Roseanne Rosetti 

Janet Sturtevant 

Typists Lorraine Marines 

Elizabeth Landers 

Distribution Charlotte Billings 

Jack Tubbs 



The editors wish to extend sincere thanks to Mr. Claiborne Young and the Photography 
Club for their invaluable aid and co-operation in the production of this yearbook. 






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For A Better World 

"We who are young' consider life 

And wonder what it hold6 

Of love and laughter, peace and strif e- 

For those with courage bold 

To meet its challenge and its price. 

>5hallwebeth.o5e who build it5 peace 

And 3ave our native land? 

Who Sing our songs and plow our fieldd 

According' to GodS plan 

For a decent world ? 

Or shall we tear our land apart 
VrthwarS deStructivce force? 
As god£ of lust and Selfishness 
Go rampamt on their course ? 
The rank results o-f: greed i 

We pray that we may -See the r^ght 

And gain the ^strength to do 

By courage and consclence,not byi 

The deeds that lead \i& to 

A true and lasting peace. 

XIaire 5tratton 








Senior Silhouettes 



HERBERT FINNEGAN 



When one thinks of "Hucksie," his low, powerful voice almost im- 
mediately comes to mind. That voice, along with intelligence and a sizeable 
amount of personal charm, has in large part brought him the success he 
enjoys in so many of the school's activities. "Hucksie" was our sophomore 
class president, a ten-cent-a-week collector for three years, and for two 
years a busy member of the S.A.S. executive council and the Pilgrim staff. 
In his junior year, he won three most distinguished honors: the state dis- 
trict competition in the American Legion Oratorical Contest, election to 
the National Honor Society, and appointment to the 1948 Massachusetts 
Boys' State. 



We are agreed that the senior corridor could not have been the same 
this year without this blond, six-footer stalking about in it. Our vice- 
president heads the Student Activities Society and also participates in 
the affairs of the Pilgrim staff and the Dramatic Club. In his junior year 
"Bobby" was a Plymouth delegate to the 1948 Massachusetts Boys' State 
at Amherst. "Bobby's" noisy sense of humor is genuinely funny and his 
serious opinions are always intelligent and sometimes rather wise. 





ROBERT SAUNDERS 



Marilyn's friendly, helpful manner and her calm good judgment 
have won her popularity and the esteem of her classmates since grammar- 
school days. Our class secretary has served actively on the S.A.S. and 
numerous dance committees, and as our junior class secretary and a bank 
teller. An avid sportstress, she played hockey, basketball and softball in 
addition to being one of the school's ablest and prettiest cheerleaders. 



MARILYN MAGUIRE 



As our class treasurer, Webster maneuvered one of the most finan- 
cially impoverished classes in P.H.S. history through the maze of gradua- 
tion expenses. As business manager of the Pilgrim, he saw that ads were 
collected in record time. Last year Webster was the hard-working presi- 
dent of the Press Club and this year he has the deserved honor of serving 
as president of the Massasoit Chapter of the National Honor Society. His. 
reputation for outstanding leadership early achieved, he had yet to amaze 
us with his versatility by making a highly successful theatrical debut as 
Francisco, the revolutionist, in Riding Down the Sky. 




WEBSTER DYER 



Proclamation 



If there are any who have read this far who would be at all interested 
in what the class of 1949 is like, read on. If not, turn the page. 

Often, in spite of our busy lives, we find an evening free for the 
movies. Of the several movies we have seen we singled out "The Best 
Years of Our Lives" because it was tops. Ingrid Bergman ^ f&K - and 
Gregory Peck <£} are the finest actress and actor we know, and 



they have always held us "Spellbound". 
Our favorite' pastime is dancing, 



and we can think of no better 



band than Vaughn Monroe's to provide our music. By the way, we espec- 
ially love popular music, and we could listen to "Stardust" : v ,#£E^k on 
any day of the week. Getting back to that wonderful music maker, 
Vaughn Monroe, he played in our favorite dancing place, 
a few years ago. Remember? 

We seniors do read, too. We think "Mutt and Jef£")%M X*p are 
swell for laughs, and we get really interested in "Life". 




Our favorite study is English, 



and speaking of studying 



brings up the subject of the radio. We love to listen to Arthur Godfrey 



and his talent scouts. 



Since our class is so wide-awake and full of pep, a fact which is evident 
to anyone who pushes through the top floor corridor at recess, our boys 




like football jjKf^ better than any other sport, and so do the girls, 
even though a game on Saturday means little voice on Sunday. 



Most of us are so busy having fun that we're always hungry. We 



choose 



/ 




as our favorite eating place. However, we just can't 



decide which food we prefer to eat there, — pizza or spaghetti. 



Well, there it is, the collective personality of Plymouth High's "forty- 



niners . 



The following attempts at poetic description of the one hundred and 
twenty individuals who contribute to that personality may not be as 
accurately and seriously treated, but perhaps the faces, which accompany 



them will tell all 



Thus, while the sun sinks down to rest 
Far in the regions of the west, 
Though to the vale no parting beam 
Be given, not one memorial gleam, 
A lingering light he fondly throws 
On the dear hills where first he rose. 

WILLIAM WORDSWORTH 



Light Verse, or Worse 




DONALD ALBERTINI 

"Doc" is nimble, 
"Doc" is quick, 
"Doc" is always 
Full of wit. 



LILLIAN ALMEIDA 

Lily always has a smile 
To while our cares away; 
But never disagree with her 
She'll argue all the day. 




MURIEL ABONS 

"Silence is golden" 
Is Muriel's rule; 
At least, she applies it 
When she's in schooL 



ALFRED ALMEIDA 

Some girls swoon 
To hear Damone croon; 
But when Alfred's about, 
They all pass out. 






RITA ANDERSON 

As a nurse she'll make a hit; 
Twill be hard her care to 

quit! 
She pleases all with habits 

neat 
And wins their hearts 

because she's sweet. 



JUDITH AUSMAN 

We've often considered 
How pleasant 'twould be 
If we all prized our sisters 
As dearly as she. 




ALLAN BAGNI 

His heart was set on football 
During the football season; 
Now his thoughts have 

wandered, 
And Audrey is the reason. 




ROBERT BALBONI 

At whatever Bobbie works 

He does his best; 

That kind of spirit, we all 

know, 
Brings great success. 



THOMAS BARNES 

With socks and sweaters 

gay and bright 
He always is a pleasing sight; 
And if his likes are 

sometimes fickle 
His laugh will never fail to 

tickle. 




WARREN BESEGAI 

Life of the party, 
The perfect host — 
He'd prove his friendship 
From coast to coast. 




CHARLOTTE BILLINGS 

Isolation is out-dated, 
Plympton's youth, 

emancipated; 
The trails it makes run 

wide and far — 
Our Charlotte's little, 

streamlined car. 



EMIL BIRNSTEIN 

Bubble's physique cannot be 

beat 
But we must all remember 
That of the great Charles 

Atlas course 
He is an honored member. 




WILLIAM BONZAGNI 

No man can have everything, 
Of that we're very sure. 
But what's the reason for 

his 
Long resisting amour? 




1,* 



ALPHONSO BORSARI 

"Junie" is the quiet type, 
Perhaps he has us guessing; 
But Lilly has his number 
Although she's not 
confessing. 




ROBERT BORSARI 

We do not care to irk him — 
We've seen his temper flare; 
And who are we to quibble, 
When he's a genius rare? 



VIRGINIA BOURNE 

Jinny's voice is much too 

small 
In her Latin class; 
But when she's with the 

cheering squad 
She's such a different lass. 




MARILYN BOWLES 

A friend to all 
With heart of gold, 
It's girls like this 
Our school should hold. 





DOLORES BRENNER 

Such sparkling personality 
We've rarely seen before; 
Miss Dolly Brenner is the 

girl 
Who has it, and much more. 



HERBERT FINNEGAN 

For the leader of our class 
Public speaking holds no 

fear; 
He orates before us all 
In his accents deep and 

clear. 





JUNE FISH 

That June's an ardent 

camera fan. 
Is plain to see; 
There's little that she doesn't 
Tackle ardently. 




FRANCES FOLGER 

You surely must have seen 
The ring on Frances' finger, 
And shortly there will be 
A matching one to linger. 



RODNEY FOWLER 

He always lends a willing 

hand 
In things we want well 

done; 
We dub him "the efficient 

type," 
And also, lots of fun. 




JOHN FRANCIS 

He might have greater 
Interest in school 
If during recess 
He could play pooL 




ADELINE FREITAS 

Adeline is charming, 
Adeline is sweet 
And as a secretary 
She'll be hard to beat. 




EDMUND FURTADO 

For Eddy the best is none 

too good — 
We feel it is his due; 
When "Fish" gets the best 

in life, 
Our hopes will then come 

true. 



THERESA GALLERANI 

In commercial subjects 
Theresa's in the lead; 
She does her work most 

accurately, 
And also with great speed. 




PHYLLIS GUIDONI 

In sports as well as studies 
She's always in a whirl; 
She's labeled by her buddies, 
"An energetic girl." 




BEATRICE GD3BS 

Instead of prating 
She spends her time 
In emanating 
A quiet charm. 



LORAINE GOODICK 

Methinks that I 
Will rarely see 
A roller skater 
As fine as she. 




BARBARA GOODREAU 

"Soda jerking has its points,' 

Says Miss G., 

"II you have appropriate 

company." 




BERNARD GOVONI 

Wavy hair and eyes so 

bright. 
Disposition gay and light, 
Sense of humor, lots of pep — 
Temper, temper, watch 

your step! 



HENRY GOVONI 

Dorsey's got what it takes; 
That is true. 

But Henry has proved that 
He's got it too. 




JOAN GOVONI 

As a dancer she can't be 

beat, 
She really rates on top; 
On her quick and nimble 

feet 
She never seems to stop. 







BARBARA GRADY 

In basketball she made a hit, 
For when she had the ball, 
She never failed to do her 

bit 
To make the score grow tall. 



CLARK GRIFFITH 

His Ford with usefulness 
Is replete; 

It brings him swiftly 
To Sandwich Street. 



JOAN GROSSER 

She always has a question. 
No matter what the project; 
We know this is the way to 

learn, 
And learning is her object. 



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FRANCES HALUNEN 

Here's to the girl who's first 

to help 
At work of any sort; 
Our hats are off to Frannie, 
An all-around good sport. 




KENWOOD HIGGINS 

Vocations are a problem 
To some young men we see; 
But if Kenny could have his 

choice, 
A jockey he would be. 



EMILY HODGDON 

We wonder 

If we should surmise 

That she's 

As soulful as her eyes. 





VIRGINIA HOLMES 

An artist so willing, 
A friend so kind 
It's rarely been 
Our luck to find. 



" 



CABMELLA IZZO 

As a rule in senior classes 
Senior lads anQ senior 

lasses 
Go together, but Carmella 
Found a certain junior 

"fella." 




LEON JOHNSON 

This charming Carver lad, 

We're told, 

With lady friends 

Is rather bold. 



ANDREW KIERSTEAD 

This clever lad 
Will join the Air Corps; 
Excitement will be 
What he's there for. 




DAVID HOGAN 

He'll never need fear 
A dreary day; 
With his silver horn 
He'll blow blues away. 



JEAN HOWE 

That she's one of the 

Plympton gals 
Everybody knows, 
By the pride with which she 

tells 
Of her Halifax beaux. 





RUTH JESSE 

Whether things go well or 

bad 
She's laughing all the while; 
And for many years to come, 
We'll see her cheerful smile. 



BARBARA KEAY 

She's received honors 
With a great deal of poise 
And has shown us her 

worth 
Though she makes little 

noise. 





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JAMES KINGSLET 

Some are always rushing 
Their many dates to keep, 
But Jim will never have to 

rush — 
He owns an army jeep. 



SALLY KRUEGER 

Twill be a sorry day 
That carries us away. 
From the spirits light and 

gay 
That belong to Sally K. 




AGNES KUHN 

There's a man in her life. 
And it's plain to see 
What a wonderful fellow 
She thinks him to be. 




BETTY LANDERS 

Betty has a sweetheart, 
But not from the U.S.A. 
He plans to come to see 

her — 
Once here, he's sure to stay. 



ANN LeCAIN 

Quiet and reserved 
Throughout the livelong 

day, 
Nothing brings her worry — 
She knows it doesn't pay. 





ANN LEONARDI 

Although among the 

aspirants 
She is the only lass, 
There's glamour and 

vivacity 
In the mechanics class. 



LOIS LUNN 

Her cheerful disposition 
Is something to admire; 
She's never unduly excited, 
Or given to bursts of ire. 



WILBUR LaVOIE 

Some men may win wide 

renown 
By writing a book; 
We predict he'll go to town 
Because he can cook. 





ALFRED LEONARDI 

The band so proudly 

playing 
A fanfare down the street- 
All this sounds nearly 

perfect, 
But Alfred's out of beat! 



MARY LODI 

If you would care to learn 

the art 
Of proper etiquette 
In just one easy lesson, 
Her decorum's the best yet. 





MARILYN MAGUIRE 

"Semper Fidelis," 
To her friends, her class, 

her team, 
But especially "always 

faithful" 
To a certain blond marine. 



RICHARD MALAGUTI 

Always eager to assist, 

We must admit; 

As ticket seller at each 

game, 
He's done his bit 



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ELLEN MANDELL 

She never had need 
To shy away 
When came along 
Report card day. 




LORRAINE MARINOS 

Sometimes serious, 
Sometimes gay, 
Her mood can change 
From day to day. 



MARJORIE MAROIS 

An honor student 
Demure and petite, 
Her words are most prudent 
And invariably sweet. 





LAURENCE MCCARTHY 

"Mac" will be a Navy man 
And sail the wide blue sea; 
We wonder if on foreign 

strands 
He'll still so quiet be. 




AGNES McKEE 

"Gilda" is a fragile lass, 
That is plain to see, 
As pretty as a picture 
And quiet as can be. 




LARS McSORLET 

He journeyed from the Pine 

Tree State 
In his Junior year; 
The class has made it 

evident, 
We're glad to have him here. 



RAY MILLMAN 

Hollywood has Van Johnson, 
Radio, Dennis Day; 
But P.H.S. was luckiest 
When it enrolled our Ray. 




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FREDERICK MONTI 

If you should slip 
And tear your britches, 
Quick! to Freddie 
For mending stitches. 





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JOHN MOREY 

If you have concluded 
That he is always shy, 
Just bait him with "Hi, 

Jacky," 
And sparks are sure to fly. 



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GEORGE MORGAN 

What goes on inside his 

head, 
We can just suspect; 
Were we to question him, 

the answer 
Would be most direct. 




GERALD MORIN 

Variety is the spice of life. 
Now Jerry, don't get sore; 
We know that you have had 

more girls, 
Than the Maharajah of 

Magador. 




SHIRLEY MORIN 

Shirley is a winsome lass, 
And quite sophisticated; 
We love to listen to her talk, 
So well enunciated. 



ALDO MORIM 

As captain of our football 

squad. 
His touchdowns brought him 

fame, 
His motto was, "Let's not 

give up, 
Until we've won this game." 




CARL MUELLER 

We wonder why 
The girls all follow 
This handsome guy, 
This blond Apollo. 




PHILIP MURPHY 

He's handsome and helpful, 

and 
His limpid eyes of blue 
Reflect the fact that he 
Is Irish through and through. 




MARY MURRAY 

Mary bas a wardrobe rare; 
Her clothes are all so neat. 
And everywhere that Mary 

goes 
Her presence is a treat 



CAROL NEMEC 

If a sparkling personality 
We were asked to note, 
For Carol's winning ways 
We'd surely cast our vote. 




HOWARD NYE 

We won't record 
That Mr. Nye 
Is anything 
But very shy. 




BARBARA PALAVANCHI 

Her worth needs no 

embellishment 
In history class. 
She's proved herself 

intelligent, 
A quizzical lass. 



VIRGINIA PATTURELLI 

Her services to P. H. S. 
Are more than we can 

measure, 
And she has proven many 

times 
Her presence is a treasure. 




CONSTANCE PAUL 

Tiny figure, 
Features small, 
A dainty picture 
Is Miss Paul. 




ELAINE PAUL 

We always seem to see 

Elaine 
With confiding friends about 

her, 
From what we know of this 

kind girl 
They have no need to doubt 

her. 



LEONARD PIERCE 

In our sensitivities 
Lennie's jokes don't fester. 
For sheer good taste we 

rank him with 
The truly classic jester. 



CARL PILLSBURY 

The room was strangely 

silent 
His classmates looked 

askance; 
For Carl had just requested 
A "Sadie Hawkins dance." 



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VIRGINIA RAE 

Though her ambition's 

nursing, 
And there she's set her 

course. 
We confidently forecast that 
She won't forget her horse. 




ELLEN REGGIANI 

The school's best collector, 
The way she would seek 
Those regular payments 
For Ten-Cents-A-Week. 



SHIRLEY ROBBINS 

Clothes in style, 
Golden hair, 
Sparkling smile, 
Sweetness rare. 







ADRIAN ROY 

"Adrian, why can't you pay 
Attention to your English?" 
"Why, Mrs. R., am I to 

blame 
If English ain't my 

language?" 




MELVIN SAMPSON 

Like several others 
It's little he utters 
Till summer comes 'round 
And he's White Horse Beach 
bound. 



ERNEST SANTOS 

It's difficult to find 

An athlete keener. 

Or more consistently on top 

Than "locker leaner." 





JOHN SANTOS 

When John had his picture 

snapped 
Aghast was he. 
Vantine asked if he distilled 
His cranberries. 




ROBERT SAUNDERS 

Our Bob is with the highest 
And in more ways than one. 
Not only in his stature 
But in all else he's done. 



DONALD SAVOT 

What is it that's needed 
To keep "Jug" awake? 
Is it more sleep, 
Or a vigorous shake? 





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PAULINE SCHIEL 

Who's good for a laugh 
And ne'er without a trick? 
It's Polly whose thoughts 
Are always lightning quick. 




ROT SCHNEIDER 

He's even tempered 
And meets his obligations; 
We never see him 
Indulge in altercations. 




MARDLYN SEAVER 

At the Plymouth Theatre 
She seems a fixture, 
She's there 'most any time 
What e'er the picture. 



RUDOLPH SHERMAN 

Friendship remaining 
But good humor waning, 
We endured Rudy 
In Driver Training. 




FRANCIS SILVA 

Uncle Sam, you've won a 

soldier, — 
The intrepid kind; 
Please permit us a "we told 

ya," 
When his worth you find. 




JAMES SILVA 

He's shown that he can 

croon 
And dance the best of any; 
We'll miss them much too 

soon — 
His witticisms many. 



HOWARD SMITH 

No matter when we are in 

town, 
His auto's whizzing by; 
And once he even got 

around 
By Riding Down the Sky. 





NANCY SPRAGUE 

Manomet boasts of Nancy 
And we savor every bit 
Of the little while she's 

been here, 
For she's really made a hit. 




HAROLD STANGHELLIN1 

He's quiet in the classroom — 
We often wonder why, 
Perhaps he stores up energy 
For his other self outside. 



ALBERT STEWART 

A hardworking boy 
With a friendly eye 
That dances at sight of 
Miss Doris Y. 




ANDREE STRAKER 

A popular heartthrob, 
This mademoiselle; 
Her charm is abounding, 
Her smile rings the belL 





CLAntE STRATTON 

She has a hearty laugh 

And a lovely voice; 

For rare vivacity 

Miss Stratton is our choice. 




JANET STURTEVANT 

As secretary and singer 
Reigns this pretty miss; 
Her talent and ambition 
Will fill her life with bliss. 



SUSANNE TAUB 

Hats off to Sue! 
We know she'll find 
Fame and fortune 
With her literary mind. 




DORIS TAVARES 

Easy to talk to 

Is our girl Doris; 

She solves our weightiest 

Problems for us. 






JOAN THOMAS 

The music that she plays 

for us 
Can still our nervous 

moods — 
Can fill the busy days for us 
With restful interludes. 



JACK TUBBS 

Jack is what's known 
As a regular guy; 
To know him at all 
Is to understand why. 





JOHN VECCHI 

All our memories of him 
Merge into a central theme; 
His worship of the Dodgers — 
His scorn for other teams. 



RUTH WALL 

When Ruthie expounds on 

her duties, 
We wax incredulous; 
She's one of our" class' 

beauties, 
And also sedulous. 





ROLLENE WATERMAN 

A bright sense of humor; 
Pretty, friendly and clever; 
Scholastically she's won 

success, 
She'll be on top forever. 



DOROTHY YOUNG 

It makes us nervous 
To think how unsung 
Is some of the service 
Proferred by Miss Young. 




*4 



THOMAS VACGHI 

In basketball 
His skill and power 
Can often make 
Six-footers cower. 



HELEN WAINIO 

Her pleasant disposition 
Has won renown; 
Twould be quite 

unbelievable 
To see her frown. 





THEODORE W ALLEY 

Walley knows how to run 

a race 
There's speed in his 440 

pace; 
District champ two years 

was he, 
Brought our school great 

victory. 



WIND7RED WRIGHT 

Through her, Middleboro 
Came to advance 
The cause of our treasury 
At the Barn Dance. 





DANIEL YOUNGMAN 

Mirror, mirror on the wall. 
Whose hair is neatest of 

them all? 
Why Danny boy, please 

don't pout; 
We think it's yours, without 

a doubt. 



The Principal Speaks 




GETTING BY 



I think it was 
Edison who said in 
reply to a question 
about genius that in 
his opinion it con- 
sisted of "one percent 
of inspiration and 
ninety-nine percent of 
perspiration." And for 
support of his opinion 
I suggest that you ex- 
amine the lives and 
works of some other 
men usually accounted geniuses: Eli Whitney, Henry Ford, Nikola Tesla, 
Archibald Coolidge, Albert Einstein, etc. Even granting their tremendous 
brain-power one has to admit that what they accomplished was as much 
the result of just plain ordinary work as of some heaven-sent inspiration. 
In fact anyone can tell you that inspiration just doesn't come to a brain 
that isn't, or hasn't been, working. 

And so the ability to work is of far more importance to most of us 
ordinary mortals than is any talent we may possess. Tho we may feel 
we are gifted in music or language or science, and tho we may rightly 
do everything we can to develop our powers in the chosen field, it is only 
the capacity for keeping "forever at it" that finally makes us effective. 

Those who know the human brain — psychologists, neurologists, etc. 
— tell us that even men of extraordinary accomplishments never begin 
to tax the capacity of that organ. Futhermore it is a matter of common 
observation — even you, at your age have seen this 1 — that people of 
quite ordinary mental powers frequently outstrip their more gifted com- 
panions simply because they have learned how to make the best use of 
the brains they have, and have been willing to do the work entailed. It's 
quite true: there is no substitute for brains; but it's equally true: there 
is no substitute for work. 

I have heard it said — and nearly every adult man or woman will 
bear this out — that the difference between success and failure can be 
measured in that "extra fifteen minutes." Or it may be that extra hour 
or extra day. The point is that if you keep on, after the other fellow 
quits, in the end you come out ahead. 

That's why "getting by" can be such a tragic waste of good human 
material — it takes so little more to be successful! The boy or girl con- 
tent with minimum results is building up an insidious habit that will rob 
him or her of satisfactions easily within reach. Mediocrity may have its 
charms, but they aren't readily discernible; it's more likely that medi- 
ocrity wears beneath its cloak the unlovely attributes of envy and fear. 
Anyway, its acceptance — especially in youth — can well be the accep- 
tance of defeat. 

Unless you are interested in your own success, no one will be. Unless 
you are willing to work for that success, no one will be impressed : — not 
even your parents. They may give you their love, but you have to earn 
their respect — you have to work for it. 



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MURIEL ARONS CLAIRE STRATTON JUNE FISH 

Creampuff curl Martha Washington Stratton Sunday best 



ELAINE PAUL NANCY ELDRIDGE 

"Look at the birdie!" "Old Rocking Chair's Got Me" 




RONALD BUSI RITA ANDERSON LILLIAN ALMEIDA NORMAN BURGESS MARILYN MAGUIRE 

"Stepping out" We'd swear it was a boy Driver Training All packed The water was cold 




DOLORES BRENNER JANET STURTEVANT BARBARA GRADT BERNARD GOVONI BARBARA GOODREAU 

The eyes have it "Hubba hubba" Pretty as a picture Give him a horse Aged, ten months 




ALLAN BAGNI 



Big "little tough guy" Aggie, such a face.! 



AGNES KUHN BETTY LANDERS DORIS TAVARES WEBSTER DYER 



Lonesome 



Waiting at the corner Full speed ahead 






Virginia Rae & CONSTANCE PAUL SUSANNE TAUB VDJGINIA HOLMES VTRGINIA PATTURELU 

Lawrence MacCarthy Always a lady Cupid? Miss Manomet, 1935 Off to Iceland 

Patience, kiddies! 






Best Girl Citizen 



Each year for the past thirteen years, the National Society of 
Daughters of the American Revolution has asked high school seniors 
throughout the country to choose from their number one on whom they 
could bestow the honor of being Best Girl Citizen. The class of '49 is 
proud to have chosen Marjorie Marois as its Best Girl Citizen. 

Marjorie has sung in the Octette and the Girls' Glee Club since her 
sophomore year in high school, and has also, since that first year, been 
a member of the Student Activities Society. As a junior, because of her 
high degree of scholastic ability and participation in school affairs, she 
was elected to the National Honor Society, one of the greatest distinctions 
one can receive in high school. As each season rolled around, "Margie" was 
to be found actively engaged in sports — hockey, basketball, and Softball. 
In this, her senior year, she has been kept busy as editor of the Senior 
Features section of the Pilgrim, and has been diligently ocupied in ac- 
quiring more of the excellent marks which gave her a place in the Honor 
Group. Marjorie's friendly smile and charming personality have made 
her many friends among teachers and students; the senior class is pleased 
with its choice of Best Girl Citizen. 

BARBARA KEAY *49 




SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

SEATED: Robert Saunders, Mrs. Miriam Raymond, Herbert Finnegan. 
STANDING: Marilyn Maguire, Webster Dyer. 




JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

SEATED: Richard Tassinari, Miss Elizabeth Kelly, Glenn McNeil. 
STANDING: Barbara McMahon, Howard Penn. 




SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 

SEATED: John Pinto, Mrs. Helen Bagnall, Louis Mengoli. 
STANDING: Kathryn Gordon, David Priestley. 



One-Twenty 

'Quiet please, keep your seat!" 
Shuffling of our nervous feet — 




Notices read, we're peeved no more, 
For soon we'll reach— THE CORRIDOR 




H 



19 



IF THERE WERE SUCH A PERSON 

The Perfect Girl Would Have: 

Hair like Audrey Calzolari's 

Eyes like Barbara Grady's 

A smile like Marilyn Maguire's 

Pep like Carol Nemec's 

Talent like Joan Thomas' 

Charm like Andree Straker's 

Intelligence like Margie Marois' 

A voice like Claire Stratton's 

Clothes like Eunice Edes' 

A "line" like Lillian Almeida's 

Neatness like Irene Fernandes' 

Wit like Ruthie Jesse's 

An appetite like Ronnie Waterman's 

Poise like Connie Paul's 

A laugh like Fran Halunen's 

Efficiency like Jini Patturelli's 

The Perfect Boy Would Have: 

Hair like Bob Saunders' 

Eyes like Bill Bonzagni's 

A smile like Ernie Santos' 

Pep like Henry Govoni's 

Talent like Dave Hogan's 

Charm like Dennis Collari's 

Intelligence like Webster Dyer's 

A voice like Jack Tubb's 

Clothes like Jimmy Silva's 

A "line" like Lars McSorley's 

Neatness like Roy Schneider's 

Wit like Billy Cingolani's 

An appetite like Clark Griffith's 

Poise like Huck Finnegan's 

A laugh like Bobby Balboni's 

Efficiency like Rodney Fowler's 



■ 






THE PERFECT TEACHER 

Would have . . . 




Mr. Edgar Mongan's faculty 
for giving pertinent, excel- 
lent advice. 



Miss Iris Albertini's recog- 
nized talent for improving 
students' study habits. 





The clarity and sincerity 
which distinguishes Mrs. 
Helen Bagnell's teaching. 



Mrs, Ruth Bailey's genius for 
knowing what everyone 
about her wants. 





Miss Mary Connolly's con- 
genial personality. 



Miss Ellen Downey's gift for 
making Ancient History 
"live." 







Mrs. Lydia Gardner's pro- 
clivity for solving problems 
and surmounting difficulties. 



The ease with which Mr. 
Carlo Guidabonl keeps his 
study hall in order. 





The willingness to be con- 
sulted by his pupils which 
characterizes Mr. Roland 
Holmes. 



Miss Jeannette Jacques' habit 
of encouraging students to 
state their personal opinions. 





Miss Helen Johnson's power 
to instill a respect for per- 
fection in her typing pupils. 



Miss Elizabeth Kelley'a 

warmth and friendliness. 





Mrs. V ir grin] a Kingman "» 
amazing ability to domesti- 
cate football players. 



Miss Nellie Locklin's ability 
to organize school projects 
efficiently. 





Mr. John Packard's notable 
talent for illustrating the 
problematical principles of 
his course by means of fas- 
cinating similes. 



The unruffled calm of Mr. 
Arthur Pyle's nature. 





Mrs. Miriam Raymond's deep 
understanding of and inter- 
est in all student problems. 



Mr. Mario Ron. 

of persuasion. 








The saving grace of Mr. 
Richard Smiley's sense of 
humor. 



Mrs. Alice Urann's ability to 
convey the fact that she 
means what she says. 





Miss Margie Wilber's sweet 
good nature. 



Mr. Claiborne Young's photo- 
graphic; assistance in the 
gathering of school memo- 
ries. 





The industry which permits 
Mrs. Margaret Brown to 
work on several projects at 
once. 




The perfect rhythm of Mr. 
John Pacheco's personality 
as well as his music. 



Miss Ardys Farnsworth's 

ready companionship. 



Miss Elizabeth Crook's gift 
for spontaneous merry-mak- 
ing. 





Those qualities of sportsman- 
ship with which Mr. John 
Walker inspires his players. 







HMH2 




*&- 



School News 



SEPTEMBER 

School opened on the eighth of September, and most of us were glad 
to be back after a full summer. We discovered eight new additions to 
our number — all girls — five seniors and three juniors. 

During the first week of school, posters everywhere advertised the 
birth of "The Ticker," and its staff was busy about school, gathering news 
for the first edition. On the thirtieth, everyone had his or her copy, and 

_--■....-.„ was favorably impressed. Sue 
Taub, editor - in - chief, received 
compliments from both teachers 
and students. 

In the latter part of the 
month, the S.A.S. began to solicit 
contributions which would go 
toward the building of an ampu- 
tees' recreation center near Bos- 
ton. Each homeroom, according 
to its enrollment, was given a 
quota to fill, and though the drive 
did not begin until halfway through the first marking period, all but two 
homerooms had filled their quotas by the end of the month. This is cer- 
tainly a praiseworthy record. 




OCTOBER 

After only a week of preparation, in which the school suffered under 
high-pressure salesmanship, the Senior Class held its Barn Dance on 
Monday night, October 11. In spite of inclement weather, the gym was 
packed with enthusiastic students, alumni, and out-of-towners who made 
good use of the smooth music of Joe Correa and his orchestra. The dance 
was the biggest success in ten years, and the seniors made a sorely needed 
profit of $131.00. 

At an S.A.S. assembly Phyllis Ensher, harpist, and Edward Manzer, 
pianist, both seniors in West Bridgewater High School, entertained the 
students. The young musicians, in the opinion 
of all, did justice to a difficult program which in- 
cluded the work of Chopin and Tschaikowsky. 

NOVEMBER 

Directress Elizabeth Crook and her fifty- 
three charges, accompanied by Mr. Edgar Mon- 
gan, left Plymouth on the morning of November 
23rd, for one of the most exciting two-day trips 
in their lives. They had been invited by the New 
Haven Railroad to sing on the steps of the New 
England Village Church on the balcony of Grand 
Central Station in New York City. 




THE GLEE CLUB IN NEW YORK 






VI 


mU 




Tr if% 1 V> ?|'~ 1/ 







Early Wednesday morning they entered their hotel rooms, exhausted 
from standing under thousands of watts of lights all afternoon in heavy 
Pilgrim dress and at the beck and call of television directors, photog- 
raphers, and radio announcers; they were hoarse from singing and filled 
to repletion with two delicious suppers, eaten within a few hours of each 
other. Nevertheless, the early morning found them eating breakfast in 
the Oyster Bar of Grand Central Station, after which a tour of the city 
was made in two glass-topped buses. They dined on a nine-course Chinese 
meal at the Port Arthur Restaurant in Chinatown, drove through more 
of the city, and were back at the station to make another radio broadcast 
just before train time late Wednesday afternoon. 

The buses from Providence arrived in Plymouth about midnight, and it 
was a group of very tired, but very happy girls that descended, weighted 
down with suitcases and souvenirs, and filled with remembrances to relate 
to all the family during Thanksgiving dinner. 

The gym Friday night, November 19, was the scene of another dance, 
this time sponsored by the S.A.S. Peggy Wood devised a clever scheme 
whereby money collected in a wishing well which occupied the center of 
the floor went to the Amputees' fund. We again danced to Joe Correa's 
music. 



DECEMBER 

The Dramatics Club, newly formed this year under the direction of 
Mrs. Urann, staged a Christmas play, Mary, His Mother, on December 23, 
the day before school closed for Christmas and New Year's vacation. Ac- 
cording to reports Mrs. Urann made cast and stagehands work until they 
were "ready to drop." As usual she did a fine job and the play was evidence 

of the hard work expended upon 
it. The cast included: Mary (vo- 
cal), "Beverly Lauterbach; Mary 
(visual), Marcia Williams; Eliza- 
beth, Charlotte Billings; Ruth, Rol- 
lene Waterman; Hannah, Barbara 
Palavanchi; angel, Kathryn Gor- 
don; wise men, Ernie Santos, 
James Garside, and Alan Minelli; 
shepherds, Jack Patrico, Aldo 
Morini, and Raymond Besegai; 
Joseph, Edwin Borsari. The Girls' 
Glee Club, under the direction of 
Miss Elizabeth Crook provided background music in the form of Christ- 
mas carols. 




JANUARY 

First period Monday, the 18th, we learned much that we had not 
known before about the business of fife insurance. In a special assembly, 
Mr. Reed, from the Savings Bank Life Insurance Association, gave us 
advice about the various types of insurance, which ones would suit our 
needs best, where it should be placed to do the most good, and how much 
one should buy. 



The school saw the presidential inauguration on the important day 
of that ceremony by means of a television receiver which had been set up 
on the stage of the auditorium. 

On Friday night, the 28th, the seniors 
sponsored the Mid- Year Frolic. The dance 
was held in the auditorium, with Joe 
Correa's orchestra providing music from 
the stage. It was quite a success socially, 
and entertainment was offered the 
dancers by five senior girls: Claire Strat- 
ton sang "A Tree In the Meadow," Lillian 
Almeida, in red bloomers, bright cotton 
plaid ' shirt, and red checked sunbonnet 
did "You Call Everybody Darlin'," and an 
original song a"hd dance routine was 
rendered by Rollene Waterman, Barbara 
Keay, and Carol Nemec. 

At an assembly on Monday, January 
31, Robert Saunders, president of the 
S.A.S., presented $429.00 to Mr. John 
Rooney, commander of the Amputee Veterans Association of America. 
Mr. Rooney, an amputee himself, explained the purposes and the organ- 
ization of the association, and expressed his deep gratitude for our gift, 
which raised the amount already collected for the planned $60,000 recre- 
ation center up over the $9000 mark. 



FEBRUARY 





On February 3, in a special assembly, 
Mrs. Mary Baker, from the State Depart- 
ment of Public Health, spoke to us on 
the subject of good grooming, appearance, 
and behavior. She was a most charming 
speaker, and everyone both profited from 
and enjoyed her straightforward expos- 
tulation upon the all-too-evident short- 
comings of teen-agers. 




TEN-CENTS-A-WEEK COLLECTORS 

FRONT ROW: Ann Capozucca, Janice Roy, Margaret Sylvia, Diamantina Rego, 

Edward Smith, Mr. Mario Romano, Beverly Carton, Shirley Knight, Joan Thomas, 

Joan Vandini. 
SECOND ROW: Robert Traverso, Peggy Wood, Violet Pinto, Beatrice Gibbs, Barbara 

Keay, Charlotte Billings, Jane Lowe, Ann English, Ellen Reggiani, Joan Cravalho, 

Chester Bagni. 
THIRD ROW: Roy Fornaciari, William Cingolani, Alfred Govoni, Richard Malaguti, 

Herbert Finnegan, Albert Stewart, James Cameron, Joseph Fonseca, Arthur Morton. 



Ten-Cents-a-Week Plan 



1938-1948 



This is the twentieth year in which the Ten-Cent-A-Week Plan has 
operated in Plymouth High School. 

In 1948 members of the plan received the benefits of a yearbook, four 
football games, eight basketball games, five baseball games, and three 
assemblies. All this would have entailed an individual expenditure of 
$8.55. It was done otherwise because ninety per cent of the school paid 
through the end of the year; the public also helped by paying admission 
at games. 

The collectors, Student Activities Society, and faculty advisors hope 
that the years to come will find the Ten-Cent-A-Week Plan as effective as 
ever in bringing to P. H. S. students "a lot for a little." 

EDWARD SMITH '50 




FOOTBALL SQUAD 

FRONT ROW: Gerald Morin, Alphonso Borsari, Thomas Churchill, Allan Bagni, Ray 
Millman, Albert Stewart, Aldo Morini, Lawrence McCarthy, Thomas Vacchi, Bernard 
Govoni, James Silva, Lars McSorley, Ronald Busi, Ernest Santos. 

BACK ROW: George Souza, Robert Gordon, Chester Bagni, John Andrews, Richard 
Tavares, Glenn McNeil, Theodore Walley, manager; David Calhoun, Robert Albertini, 
Allan Minelli, Ralph Ferioli, Richard Benassi, Leonard Sullivan, Richard Martinelli. 



Football, 1948 



It was the beginning of a new adventure for some; for others, 
only the beginning of a new season of football. It was one of hard practise 
and, whether won or lost, each game was fought in the best tradition of 
sportsmanlike perseverence. 

When the team organized, a week before the opening of school, there 
were only three regulars back from last year's team: Captain Dede Morini, 
Ernest Santos, and Lars McSorley. But the fast team, lightest in P.H.S. 
history, with only forty candidates, was speedily whipped into shape for 
its opening game with Rockland at Plymouth. Coach Johnny Walker was 
again assisted by Faculty Manager Mario Romano who handled the line, 
and both mentors were looking for shiftiness and speed in the Plymouth 
attack for the coming season. 

ROCKLAND 

It was a fine feeling to begin the new season, which was welcomed 
by a large crowd, with a score of 33 to 0. Everybody did a great job in 
helping Captain Morini, Albertini, and Besegai get the touchdowns. What 
the team had to offer in defense was not tested, as Rockland was rarely 
in possession of the ball. 

BRIDGEWATER 

Another good job of blocking and tackling brought Plymouth their 
second win of the season; they defeated Bridgewater by a score of 27 to 
0. The boys got down to business in the very early stages of the game 
when they grabbed a Bridgewater fumble. They opened up with a 33 
yard advance to set up a six pointer as Bagni scored on a line buck. Before 
the final whistle blew, the second team had a chance to show what it 
could do, persistantly advancing but being unable to put over a touch- 
down. 

MIDDLEBORO 

The homecoming bus was very quiet that afternoon, for the team had 
lost a game to Middleboro, which stepped on them hard with a score of 
20 to 0. Middleboro High holds a strong club and we were out-weighed in 
every position. 



WHITMAN 

One of the team's busiest games occured at Whitman Memorial Field. 
Here Morini supplied most of Plymouth's offensive jaunts, while Eddie 
Clark championed Whitman. Good teamwork and his own ability enabled 
Captain Morini to carry an intercepted Whitman pass back to Ply- 
mouth's forty-five yard line. With thirty-five seconds left to play, Andrews 
threw a long pass to Morini, who, despite two Whitman tacklers at his 
heels, managed to take the ball around his right end to score the tying 
touchdown. 

ABINGTON 

It was late in the third period that Plymouth started to roll up the 
field as Andrews completed a pass to Albertini. At the beginning of the 
fourth period Bagni, on a quarterback sneak, went for the second touch- 
down of the game, and Morini secured the extra point. Completing a 
free pass, Abington managed to get up to Plymouth's four-yard line and 
go over for a touchdown. Abington 
completed the extra point as the 
game ended with Plymouth 13 and 
Abington 7. 2fc _^# »»- 

BARNSTABLE 

The Plymouth-Barnstable game 
will be remembered for sometime by 
many of the fans who saw it. The 
great moment of the game came 
when Andrews threw a pass in the 
end zone to Santos, who was sur- 
rounded by enemy players. Then a 
pair of long arms reached to grab 
the ball tying the game 6 all. With 
the minutes ticking away, the fel- 
lows lined up to try for the point; 
it was made good by Morini. The 
game ended with Plymouth 7 and 
Barnstable 6. 

STOUGHTON 

The Stoughton game marked another sad day for Plymouth High. It 
was dealt the heavy blow of 27 to by the team which it hails as its 
heaviest and best opponent of the season. 

ATTLEBORO 

Everything looked promising as the team led at the end of the first 
quarter 6 to and at the half with 13 to 7. Then, at the end of the third 
quarter Attleboro tied the score and, in the closing minutes of the game, 
managed with a few fast moving plays to win 19 to 13. Captain Morini 
and the rest of the fellows played the game of the season that afternoon, 
and it was disheartening to see them lose it. 




^flH 



The team salutes its captain, its coaches, the cheer leaders, and the 
student body; they encouraged it to continue the fight to win even when 
it was losing. The boys proved that they had a fighting spirit when they 
accomplished their four wins, one tie, and three loses. Every game was 
well played by every man, who did his level best for school and team. 




S t I . I § 9 






GIRLS' HOCKEY 

FRONT ROW: Diamantina Rego, Louise Gavoni, Claire Stratton, Marilyn Maguire, 

Joan Vandini, Florence Silva, Audrey Calzolari. 
SECOND ROW: Miss Ardys Farnsworth, Judith Jackson, Judith Ausman, Virginia 

Peck, Carolyn Almeida, Marjorie Marois, Virginia Patturelli. 
THIRD ROW: Jacqueline Boyer, Violet Pinto, Beverly Lauterbach, Virginia Rae, 

Nancy Merritt, Dorine Ausman. 

Bumps and Bruises 

After several practises with coach Caroline Parren our girls' hockey 
team felt confident of victory. And although their confidence was soon 
shaken, the girls made many new friends and learned the meaning of 
sportsmanship. 

On the 11th of October Plymouth scored against the Bourne team 
when Virginia Peck smashed through the middle. Bourne couldn't push 
any over. 

The Middleboro girls came to Plymouth on the 13th of October and 
handed our girls their first defeat of the season. Middleboro made the 
only score of the game in the first half. The second teams tied 1 — 1. 

On October 21th, our girls went to Middleboro and were again de- 
feated. 

Bourne was the object of the Plymouth team on October 27, with a 
very close and tight game ensuing, but to no avail. Our girls lost 1 — 
in the second half. 

On November 1st, our girls were met by a formidable Hingham team 
which defeated us by a score of 2 — 0. Their second team outscored us 
also. 

Plymouth met the toughest adversary of the season in Scituate on 
November 3rd. Their players succeeded in putting over four goals, while 
our girls couldn't get any across. The second team tied 2 — 2. 

And so another hockey season came to an end, and we blush with the 
record of one win and four defeats. 





GIRLS' BASKETBALL 

FRONT ROW: Audrey Calzolari, Marjorie Marois, Joan Grosser, Nancy Sprague, 

Judy Ausman, Betty Landers, Claire Stratton. 
SECOND ROW: Miss Ardys Farnsworth, coach; Ellen Mandell, Barbara Grady, June 

Fish, Virginia Patturelli, manager. 
THIRD ROW: Anne "Davis, Frances Halunen, Charlotte Billings, Virginia Holmes, 
Virginia Rae. 



Girls Basketball 



With about seventy-two girls reporting to the locker room in answer 
to the call of their favorite sport, the 1949 basketball season looked prom- 
ising. Coach Carolyn Parren and Coach Ardys Farnsworth were confident 
of a victorious season, but it was later learned that the girls would be 
unable to compete with out-of-town teams as they had formerly. An in- 
tramural program in which all the girls could participate, was therefore 
arranged. 

Seven teams were organized — two consisting of senior girls, three of 
juniors, and two of sophomores. Some snappy games were played and 
during the first round of the season the seniors won 8 games, the juniors 
10 games, and the sophomores 4 games. 

As the Pilgrim went to press it was anticipated that the girls would 
play a game with Middleboro and later on a game with the faculty. On 
the whole the season proved to be an enjoyable one. 




CROSS COUNTRY SQUAD 

SEATED: Joseph Einstein, Lawrence MacCarthy, Capt. Robert Borsari, Emil Birnstein. 

William Bonzagni. 
STANDING: Mr. Carlo Guidoboni, William Drew, James Cameron, Randall Douglas, 

John Hebard, Wayne Terry. 



Cross Country 



Cross-Country, which was revived here in the fall of 1946, got under 
way last year with the help of Captain Robert Borsari, Wayne Terry, Al- 
bert Stewart, Emil Birnstein, Howard Penn, and William Bonzagni. 

On November 9 Plymouth came in second in the South Shore district 
meet. Rockland was first with 26 points, Plymouth second with 38, Mid- 
dleboro third with 59, and Norwell with 142. Scituate, Sumner, and Hing- 
ham also competed. 

The last meet of the year was in Boston at the Franklin Park course 
on Saturday, November 13. There were three to four hundred running in 
the class A and B Interscholastic Meet. Plymouth came in 8th in the class 
B standings in the state of Massachusetts. 

A great deal of the credit for all the success the team enjoyed goes to 
Coach Carlo Guidaboni who is doing much to make track and cross- 
country a popular sport at Plymouth. 



THE SEASON'S RECORD 

Weymouth 24 32 

Rockland 22 33 

Middleboro 22 36 

South Shore 

District Meet Plymouth — 2nd Place 

Massachusetts 

Interscholastic Meet .... Plymouth — 8th Place 








BOYS' BASKETBALL 

FRONT ROW: Clifford Bright, Richard Burgess, John Andrews, Ernest Santos, Aldo 

Morini, William Cingolani, Richard Tassinari, Glenn McNeil. 
SECOND ROW: Mr. Joffrey Nunez, Leon Scagliarini, Assistant Manager, Daniel Verre, 

Linwood Raymond, James Kingsley, Roy Forniciari, Manager Richard Weaver. 
THIRD ROW: Richard Drew, Ronald Juliani, Paul Zaniboni, Clyde Balboni, Billy 

Morton, Henry Savi, Louis Mengoli, David Pyle. 



Boys Basketball 



The Plymouth varsity basketball team had a good '48 -'49 season. 
The high schoolers played well all through the season. 

On December 17, 1948 Plymouth traveled to Boston Garden to play 
Deering High School of Maine. Although this was their first game and they 
were not experienced, they played a good game, losing by a 36 to 30 score. 
On December 28, 1948, the high school team played the alumni at the 
high school gym. The varsity lost again in an overtime period by a score 
of 40—35. 

Plymouth then journeyed to Providence, Rhode Island to play War- 
ren High School which it defeated making the first win of the season. 
The game was. preliminary to the professional Provi- 
dence Steam Rollers — Chicago Stags game in the 
Providence Auditorium. 

The Sippican Indians of Marion came to Memorial 
Hall on January 4, 1949 to play Plymouth and were 
easily beaten 39—28. 

The next game was the first league game for 
Plymouth. On January 7, they played Middle- 
boro, and this game proved to be one of the most 
exciting of the season. Plymouth nosed out Middle- 
boro, by one point, the score being 40 to 39. The 
Plymouth Varsity was sparked to victory by Johnny 
Andrews with 13 points and Billy Cingolani with 10 
points to his credit. 

Plymouth then was ready to win again by beating 
Rockland and later Hingham but the boys from 
Plymouth couldn't get going. On January 11, Ply- 





mouth lost to Rockland by a score of 
43 — 49 and to Hingham the following 
week with 34-^3. 

Plymouth got its second league game 
win over Abington on January 18, with an 
easy 32 — 25. Dick Tassinari was high 
scorer for the night with 11 points while 
Johnny Andrews racked up 10 points. 

Plymouth, on January 21, played a 
non-league game against Weymouth and 
lost by a score of 30 — 38. The loss was 
not too important however, not having taken place in a league game. 

Plymouth easily won its third league game on January 25, beating 
Whitman by a score of 57 — 31. Johnny Andrews was high scorer with 
16 points to his credit and Ernie "Moose" Santos gained 15 points. 

The Plymouth Varsity then went to Hingham to try to win a return 
match but the team of Hingham was again too much for Coach Nunez' 
boys. The Hingham varsity won by the one sided score of 68 — 46. 

Plymouth's Blue and Whites played another non-league game at 
Memorial Hall on February 1, against the team from Braintree. Plymouth 
played excellently and won in an exciting overtime period by the score 
of 46 — 44. Ernie Santos was high scorer for the night with 18 points. John 
Andrews had five points to his credit in the overtime alone. 

On February 4 and February 8, Plymouth's varsity played at Mem- 
orial Hall, beating Abington and Middleboro respectively. Both of these 
games were very hard fought but Plymouth emerged twice the winner. 
Plymouth won over Abington and Middleboro by close scores. 

The Blue and Whites from Plymouth played at Memorial Hall 
on February 11, against Rockland. If they could win this one they would 
be in a tie for first place in the league with Rockland and Hingham, but 
Plymouth couldn't seem to get a lead and hold it. The final score gave 
Rockland 43, Plymouth 37. 

When these important wins and losses are averaged up, we have the 
record of an excellent season of basketball. Coach Jeffrey Nunez said, 
during the season, that he thought this team of 1948 — 1949 was the best 
ever to represent Plymouth High School. 





CHEERLEADERS 

FRONT: Virginia Bourne, Jacqueline Boyer, "Ebenezer," Audrey Calzolari. 
STANDING: Joan Vandini, Louise Govoni, Violet Pinto, Marilyn Maguire, Lillian 



Almeida. 



CHEERLEADERS 



Plymouth High School was fortunate this year in its cheerleaders. 
Where the Blue and White sought victory on the gridiron or on the bas- 
ketball court there our spirited cheerleaders were to be found urging the 
boys onward to triumph or giving them the accolade of courage in defeat. 
An outstanding achievement this year was the procurement of new 
uniforms by their own efforts in selling pins, stickers, and stationery. This 
they did under the leadership of Miss Connolly and with the cooperation 
of Mr. Mongan and Mr. Romano. 

This year, too, the Senior cheerleaders received their letters in Jan- 
uary rather than in June. So joyful were they that even Ebenezer, their 
Kerry Blue terrier mascot, emitted a long locomotive and prolonged growl 
of happiness. 

Faithful, unstinting practice gave to the cheerleaders their desired 
objective — enthusiastic student support of our athletes. 







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"Riding Down 




5. "The Marines Have The Situation Well In Hand" 



the Sky" 




4. "Tomorrow, Tomorrow Is The Grandest Day Of AH" 




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ORCHESTRA 



CANDID CAMERA 

Keys to Music pictures listed on back page. 





Fulfillment of our dreams appears; 

Our burnished joys replace the tears; 
Our cherished hopes remove despair; 

Our memories the wounds impair; 
All seem to come from music. 

The pauper is a king so fair, 

With wealth, position, power rare, 

Dressed all in ermine, tip to toe, 
A monarch in a robe of snow; 

The pauper's rich, from music. 

The coward does no longer crave 
The courage of a hero brave; 

He's no paltroon; he's strong and true, 
A fearless man who dares to do 

Most anything, from music. 

The lover sees his dreams come true, 
He builds a little home for two, 

A picket fence the house around, 
He got just what he sought and found, 

He's happy, gay, from music. 



GLEE CLUB 



The venerable relives the time, 

When bells of youth did ring and chime; 
When silver threads before were gold, 

There were no thoughts of growing old; 
He's carefree, yes, from music. 

From out the past, comes just one more, 

A little boy of three or four; 
He's yearning for a puppy small, 

To love and cherish most of all; 
He holds his wish, from music. 

Perhaps you wish some dream'd come true; 

Perhaps you don't know what to do; 
Just listen to a strain or more, 

And you'll have promised dreams galore; 
It's easy when there's music. 

LOUISE GAVONI '50 




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Keys to Music pictures listed on back page. 




STUDENT ACTIVITIES SOCIETY 



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Keys to Curricular pictures listed on back page. 




PRESS CLUB 




ular Groups 



PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB 




C.A.F. COMMITTEE 



Keys to Curricular pictures listed on back page. 



BANK TELLERS 






Biology Club 



The Biology Club is an informal group organized to take field trips 
and to make a more complete study of certain fields of the subject than 
it is possible to make in the regular classes. 

During the fall and early winter, several field trips were taken along 
the shore and into the woods to collect specimens. A member's bait shop 
was visited. 

One of the many interesting indoor activities has been assembling a 
complete insect collection. Also useful instruction has been given in such 
things as microscope technique, making permanent microscope slides, and 
culturing bacteria and molds. 




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Office Assistants 



Our School Secretary, Mrs. Bailey, and the little "cogs" in the "wheel" 
which efficiently carries the burdens of small chores and important ad- 
ministrative duties of busy school days. 





HONOR GROUP 

FRONT ROW: Beatrice Gibbs, Susanne Taub, Rollene Waterman, Marjorie Marois, 

Barbara Keay. 
BACK ROW: Ellen Mandell, Virginia Holmes, Mrs. Miriam Raymond, Clark Griffith, 

Webster Dyer. 




HONOR SOCIETY 

FRONT ROW: Beverly Carton, Barbara Mentzel, Susanne Taub, Marjorie Marois, 
Virginia Holmes, Joanne Thomas, Barbara Keay, Shirley Knight, Lorraine Monte, 

SECOND ROW: Louise Gavoni, Ellen Mandell, Rollene Waterman, Seth Kallio, Webster 
Dyer, Robert Saunders, Herbert Finnegan, Clark Griffith, Joanne Vandini, Marilyn 
Maguire, Diamentina Rego. 



P. HI, 



IMAGINATION 

O wild imagination! 
What thoughts arise to mind 
And, unchecked, crowd my idle hours, 
To leave dull cares behind. 

Dreams that soar on silver wings, 
And sail the seven seas, 
Or climb the highest mountains 
With the mightiest of ease. 

My thoughts return to humdrum life, 
The cares and needs of station: 
I thank thee for the pleasant hours, 
O wild imagination. 

RUTH WALL '49 



METAMORPHOSIS 

Up from the deep and the dark and the 

damned, 
I rise to the sunlight and spring-smell of air. 
Off on the wings of the bird shall I fly 
Into the cloud-puffs, and heavens found 

there; 
Formerly one of the lizards of earth 
Doomed to existence of burrow and crawl, 
Escape seeming only a figment of mind, 
I flee to the sun, to the life that is all. 

To revel in glories which nature has spun 
Is for those who can burst from the cell 
to the sun. 

JOAN GROSSER '49 



GENESIS 

Great import filled the unexpected time 

When I in artless, youthful ecstasy 

Gazed from the royal perch that crowned 

my climb 
Down on the waving grasses and the sea, 
Which never would admit officious hands 
To stultify their wild magnificence; 
That day was born imprudence to demand 
Of heaven's secrets some signficance: 
Of fertile earth and tender budding leaves, 
Of ev'ry newborn thing's distinctive song, 
Of beating hearts and ancient weathered 

eaves, 
Of virtue's powers and the charms of 

wrong, — 
That explanation I was led to seek 
Which never man nor mountain top may 

speak. 

SUSANNE TAUB '49 



FOR THEY KNOW NOT 

In the tumult of each day, 
Through the mud and murk and mire, 
To attain his selfish way 
Though it mean hot Hades' fire — 
Man, the blessed child of God, 
Forever battles on. 

When the Savior came to earth — 
"Born that men no more should die, 
Born to give them second birth — " 
Those selfsame men cried, "Crucify 
The Prince* of Peace, God's Holy Son, 
On a cross for all to mock." 

Even on the rugged cross, 

Bruised and bleeding, crowned with thorn, 

Scorned by those not knowing loss, 

Jesus was not then forlorn. 

Forever, "Forgive them, Father, 

For they know not what they do." 

WEBSTER DYER "49 



A CITY IS BORN 

West of the prairies 
Rose a town made of wood; 
A street on the desert, 
Where a few buildings stood. 

Here sounds in the air 
Were the snorts of the cattle; 
On the false-fronted structures 
The slight winds made rattle. 

Its people — the rugged, 
The healthy, the hunted, 
The seekers of fortune, 
Their troubles confronted. 

On the outskirts the desert 
Bleak, eerie and lonely, 
And an alkali river 
Where buzzards flew only. 

No great steel castles, 
No loud traffic horn, 
But this was the root 
Whence a city was born. 

Frontier town long gone — 
Dreamlike, but still real, 
Here the source, and the spawn 
Whence came cities of steel. 

JANE HILTON '51 



Literate ire 



PIONEERS 

Brave, determined men and women 
Fighting for their true belief — 
Forging forward, never looking 
Backward to the path they leave, 
Over river, over mesa, 
Forward on unbroken trail — 
Ever looking, never stopping, 
For they know they will not fail. 

DORIS YOUNGMAN '51 



AT DAWN 

The sky, 

Like a palette, 

Is splashed 

With brilliant hues 

That gleam and glow 

And rise and fall 

In rythmic flow. 

JANICE ROY '51 



RICHES 

A list of lovely things I make — 
Through sorrow of the years to take: 
My dog whose soulful, limpid eyes 
Bring me many laughs and sighs; 
Next the hills against the sky, 
And winter winds that whistle by; 
Then the fields in early spring, 
And merry robins on the wing; 
But best of all the things I know 
Is mother's face in firelight glow. 

ALISON HARPER '51 



NATURE'S MUSIC 

The humming of a hummingbird, 

The bumble of a bee, 
The twitter of a robin when 

He sings his song to me, 

The bubbling of a tiny brook, 

The patter of the rain, 
The gentle murmur of the wind, 

While playing in the lane, 

The crackle of a glowing log 
When from the flame it rears, 

Then drops to scatter sparks about 
Is music to my ears. 

The orchestra of nature plays 

At any time at all, 
And all one has to do is go 

To nature's music hall. 

RITA ANDERSON '49 



VIEWPOINT 

Pehaps you see no beauty 

In simple things in life, 

But some small person loves them 

As rewards for earnest strife. 

Perhaps you see no beauty 
In your neighbor's leaning barn, 
But to the farmer's weary eyes 
It's existence for his farm. 

Perhaps you see no beauty 
In a youngster's "twenty-two," 
But in his young and shining eyes 
It's a year-long dream come true. 

Perhaps you see no beauty 

In a little boy's first fish, 

But in surprised and sparkling eyes 

Is fulfillment of a wish. 

FRANCES HALUNEN '49 



THOUGHTLESSNESS 

A little bit of hatred 

Can spoil a score of years 
And blur the eyes that ought to smile, 

With many needless tears. 

A little bit of thoughtlessness 

And anger for a day 
Can rob a home of all its joys 

And drive delight away. 

A little bit of shouting 

In a loud and vicious tone 
Can leave a sting that may be felt 

When many years have flown. 

And just one hasty moment 

Of ill temper can offend 
And leave an inner injury 

The years may never mend. 

CORA GLASS '50 



EXPLANATION, PLEASE! 

Imagination plays the part 
Of inspiration in modern art, 
Where many paintings oddly seem 
Like fragments from the artists' dream. 
Yet, I can't seem to figure out 
What these weird pictures are about. 
I've stood for hours and tried to cope 
With these creations — but there's no hope! 
I guess I'll never understand the part, 
These paintings play in modern art. 

MARY COTTI '50 



RESIGNATION 

I think that I shall never see 
A flattering photograph of me 
A photograph that I can place 
Inside my book without disgrace. 

It matters not what clothes I wear, 
How neatly I arrange my hair, 
My lipstick's straight, I always smile, 
And yet it never proves worth while. 

Now Mother says I won't be able 
To look at all like Betty Grable. 
So I'm resigned, and I can see 
I'm very sure to look like me. 

VIRGINIA HOLMES '49 



My Struggle with Mathematical Fractions 

My pain's with mathematical fractions 

Have creased my brow with contractions, 

For I groan and I mumble 

And to everyone grumble 

A plea that there be no distractions. 

Fractions with numbers don't faze me; 
A few symbols will not bemaze me; 
But exponents, cube root, 
Cause me pain that's acute; 
Quadratic equations near craze me. 

There are rules one can learn — I should 

know 'em; 
As for fears, I could overthrow 'em; 
But what truly beats me 
Is that the struggle which greets me 
Is doubled when I write a poem. 

BARBARA KEAY '49 



OUR DESIRE 

We wish we had a corner store 
Where everyone could meet. 
A place, that moving pictures show, 
To sing and dance and eat. 

It would be fun, when school is o'er. 
To see our friends again, 
To talk about the game last night 
And those we hope to win. 

But moving pictures are not real, 
And so we'll all agree, 
There couldn't be a corner store 
Like the one we long to see. 

SHIRLEY KNIGHT '50 



TO A FLATTERER 

You call me witty, wise, and fair, 
Sweet words, I will admit, 
You praise my eyes and lips and hair, 
But I'm not fooled a bit. 

I'm your delight, I'm your despair, 
I'm all that you adore — 
I don't believe a word you say 
But, darling, tell me more. 

HILDA COSTA '50 



COMPANION 

With rosy cheeks and golden hair, 

Ruby lips, and eyes that stare — 

With chubby fingers and tiny feet, 

A dress that's fresh, and a smile that's sweet, 

She hears no sound and makes no call — 

My little sister's baby doll. 

.ANN MONTANARI '51 



FRENCH 




Elles Prevent de Paris 

Paris has long been a mecca of enchantment to Americans. Tales of 
the gaiety and exuberance of life cast a magical spell over the seven 
senior French students; They are all diligent students; but sometimes the 
allure of Paris is too powerful to resist and young minds wander across 
the sea. 

"Imparfait, subjonctif, idioms, inflecions" . . . 
the lesson drones on already thoughts have 

strayed to Paris. 

The bookstalls are on the banks of 
the river Seine . . . what pleasant hours 
are spent browsing through the old books. 
The water colors tacked onto the stalls 
flutter gaily in the breeze. The waters of 
the Seine, that everchanging river which 
severs Paris, are ruffled. Under the leafy 
branches, the aged book-sellers peddle 
their wares. The peddlers, ancient as the 
Seine itself, sit idly as Parisians argue violently about the affairs of the 
day. There is a strange gaiety among the books, paintings and myriad 
curiosities. An old lady sells .violets and mignonette here. The sun is 
sinking as the weary peddlers close the cupboards over the relics and 
curios. The Seine is calm now, reflecting the mood of dusk in Paris. 

ROLLENE WATERMAN 

I am standing in front of the cathedral of Notre 
Dame. The spell of its ageless beauty falls over me. 
I mount the steps, go through the door, and wander 
through the maze of separate chapels, with a guide 
by my side to tell me the stories connected with 
it. One of the best known is the story of poor 
Quasimodo, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, by 
Victor Hugo. I walk up endless steps to one of the 
towers and below me I can see Paris, that wonder- 
ful city of enchantment. 

BARBARA KEAY 

The curtain rises upon the first act of 
Bizet's Carmen. I am seated in the magnificent 
Paris Opera House. The Opera House in Paris 
is one of the most splendid in the world. Its 
paintings and works of art are renowned. Every 
year the Paris Opera Company presents two 
performances, open to the public. The elegance 
of this vast building seems to me to be a sym- 
bol of all Paris. 

CLAIRE STRATTON 

Paris, to me, is synonymous with fashion. Worth, Fath, 
Schiaparelli, all hold court. I am in an exquisite, high-ceil- 
inged room, where lithe mannequins show the new creations 
of the famous designers. With a trunkful of dresses, I shall 
return home. Everywhere I'll hear the exclamations that 
follow my statement, "This is a Paris original!" 

JOAN GROSSER 







T3SB? 









Montmartre ... the quaint, romantic section 
of Paris . . I wander up and down the interest- 
packed boulevards until I come to the "Place du 
Tertre " Here, I remember reading, is a true center 
of budding, struggling, artistio genius! I cannot 
pass one of the farm houses which have been con- 
verted into cabarets without excitedly assuring 
myself that at least one gaily gesticulating French- 
man within is a future Renoir. And when I reach 
the world-famous cafe, Le Lapin Agile (The Nimble 

Rabbit) which is known to be the haunt of many French artists I find 
myself unable T to digest anymore observations, but only a cool lemon- 
mint drink. susanne taub 

As I sit at the table in a sidewalk cafe, I notice the 
waiter coming toward my table with the menu. I scan 
it quickly, looking for the French words I recognize. 
Finally I give my order to the garcon in my best French, 
hSingl don't sound too American. I notice the flowers 
everywhere; that certain unmistakable charm which is 
"continental" pervades Paris, and the mformahty of a 
street cafe blends with it into a thrillingly cosmopolitan 
atmosphere. andr£e straker 

I enter the Louvre, world-famous art 
museum, dazed by the immensity of this 
building. The walls are covered with beau- 
tiful paintings. Here is the Mona Lisa. What 
an enigmatic smile; What are all the peo- 
ple looking at? It's the Winged Victory of 
Samothrace. And looking over there I find 
the famed Venus De Milo. What extraord- 
inary works of art. The museum itself has Francis I 
white marble steps and gilded decorations; it looks as ^ough^anas I 
might still be using it as one of his palaces. The Louvre is a symooi u 
the ever-present art and culture in Paris today. 






The Importance of Latin 

Many a high school student asks what use Latin is to him and 
wonders why he must study it at all. Maybe if he realized its importance 
he would not feel as he does about it. 

Latin in the first place, makes the English language more intelligible. 
As two-thirds of the English words are derived from Latin, studying it 
will increase his vocabulary as well as help him see the real meanings 
of some of our well-known English words. 

Latin is the foundation of French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, and 
Roumanian; taking a study of it will make it easier to learn these other 
languages. It is also a good basis for the study of languages in general. 

Latin and Greek are essential to an intimate knowledge of art and 
decorative designs. A large number of articles have classical designs at 
their beginning or end which bear directly upon the meaning of the arti- 
cle, a person will enjoy them more if he is able to perceive this relation. 

Latin and Greek words form a large part of the terminology of science. 
It is easier to remember the meanings of terms in physiology, physics, 
chemistry, and other sciences with an understanding of Greek and Latin; 
without it, in fact, these sciences are in some cases almost unintelligible. 

Latin contributes more or less directly to success in the professions. 
Lawyers and doctors especially, must know their Latin; and ministers, 
engineers, newspaper men and business men should have some knowledge 
of it. 

Latin is the language of the Catholic religion of today. Catholic pray- 
ers, hymns, and rituals are composed in Latin. 

Only the people that know little about Latin will say that it is a 
dead language. 

KATHRYN GORDON '51 



l/VT/N LANGUftGC 









Latin 



Let's look and see 
What Latin class would h- 
If Mount Olympus 
Were Room 103. 



MISS MARGIE WILBER 
Juno, Queen of the Divinities 




RITA ANDERSON 
Goddess of Health 

Rita like Hygeia 
Someday will be; 
It's her ambition 
To nurse us, you see. 




BARBARA GRADT 
A Speechless Goddess 

In Roman days Echo 
Could not speak a line, 
But we think that Barbie 
Makes up for her lost time. 




ALFRED ALMEIDA 
God of Merriment 

Bacchus of joy 
Was god in his day; 
We have this boy 
To brighten our way. 



VIRGINIA BOURNE 
Goddess of the Dawn 

Aurora was famed 
For brightness past compare; 
Virginia lights the room up 
With her shining yellow hair. 





DENNIS COLLARI 

Son God 

Appollo traversed 
The sky at dawn 
As Dennis drives 
To school each morn. 



HERBERT FINNEGAN 

King of Gods 

To hear this lad translate 

Is to deduce 

That no one in Rome could have 

matched him 
Excepting Zeus. 




I •/ 




LEONARD PIERCE 

God of Gates and Portals 

Janus watched all, 
But spoke not a word; 
Leonard talks always, 
But never is heard. 





ROBERT SAUNDERS 
God of Speed 

Mercury was quick as a flash 
And witty as could be. 
Now doesn't the description 
Fit Bobby to a tee? 




ANDREW KIERSTEAD 
God of Mischief 

The life of this mischievous 
Fellow, we feel 
Holds for friend Andrew 
Enormous appeal. 




MARJORIE MAROIS 

Goddess of Beauty 
On -Mount Olympus, 
If we had our choice, 
Goddess of beauty 
Would be Miss Marois. 



PAULINE SCHIEL 
Muse of Comedy 

We think that she's 
The perfect lass 
To represent Thalia 
In our class. 




SUSANNE TAUB 
Muse of Poetry 

Patron of words 
Was Calliope 
That's what Susanne 
Would seem to be. 





JOAN THOMAS 
Goddess of Rhythm 

Who brings along music 
Wherever she may be? 
No one but Joan; 
Terpsichore is she. 



ROLLENE WATERMAN 

Goddess of Wisdom 

Minerva was clever, 

Quick and smart 

On this earth 

Ronnie should play her part. 







1. Physics: the study of mechanics, heat, electricity, sound, 
and light. 







3: Biology: the science that collects, studies, and explains 
the facts about plants and animals. 



The 3 




4. Radio: do you know hoi 
your radio? Could you r 
ioys can. 



T 



ciences 




und is transmitted through 
istruct a radio set? These 




5. Auto Mechanics: A model "A" Ford engine is the speci- 
men by means of which Plymouth High School students 
come to understand the mechanics of movable vehicles. 







2. Chemistry: the study of atoms and molecules, and of 
how they combine to make up the elements and com- 
pounds. 




Math 



Problem: 



Robert Borsari and James Cameron, two of our track stars, were 
racing one day. Jim was 100 feet ahead of Bob, and Bob hustled to catch 
up with him. By the time Bob had covered the 100 feet, Jim had gone 25 
feet. If you keep on this way, dividing by two, it seems that there will 
always be a space between the two boys, even if they run forever. Is 
that true? 

Solution: No. If Bob is catching up, he is running faster than Jim; there- 
fore he will have to pass Jim. 

Problem: 

Think of a number, double it, add any even number, then divide by 
two, and add the number first thought of. 

Solution: The answer will be x k the even number you added. If you victi- 
mize a friend, do some calculations after you know the answer. 

Problem: 

Think of the number of the month in which you were born. Multiply 
this number by two, add 5, then multiply the answer by 50, and add your 
own age. Now subtract the days of the year, 365, and add 115. 

Result: The first number of the answer will be the month of your birth, 
the last your age. 



Problem: 

Think of a number, preferably small, subtract 1 from it, next multi- 
ply the answer by 2 and add the number first thought of. 

Solution: Add 3 to the total and divide by 3. Disregarding any fraction, 
you will have the number first thought of. 




Home Arts 



Both boys and girls seem to adapt themselves easily to domestic tasks 
set before them; at least, so we are lead to believe here at P.H.S. In the 
course of the year, garments were made, the girls sewing dresses, skirts, 
and blouses; while the boys concentrated upon delicately designed aprons. 

In culinary achievement it seems to have become a tradition here 
that the male students display unusual proficiency. 




Classroom 





■ 



SHE* 




MAIN STREET LOOKING NORTH 1885 







MAIN STREET LOOKING NORTH 1949 







(Plymouth. SaninqA. dktnk. 



ESTABLISHED 1828 



PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



Best wishes to the 
Qraduating Class of 



1949 



C V) 




6 - 8 Court St. 




EST. 1919 



HBOH SIGHS 

SALES - SERVICE - MAINTENANCE 

ERECTION 

LETTERING OF ALL KINDS 

TRUCK & AUTO SPRAYING 



us 



JL PLYMOUTH 33 
T ST. t%XM 



HH*OUTH 



Compliments 
of 

SOUTH CENTRE MARKET 



Compliments of 



MORSE & SHERMAN 



WM. J. SHARKEY 



Court Street 



Plymouth 



Cape Insurance Agency 

Amedeo V. Sgarzi Orfeo H. Sgarzi 
Enrico Ferrari 

INSURANCE 


JESSE A. HOLMES & SON 
WOODEN BOXES 

Tel. 10-3 Carver. Mass. 


for Everything Insurable 

4 Court St. Plymouth, Mass. 

Tel. 66 


Compliments of 

L. W. JENNEY 

MEATS and GROCERIES 

Phone Carver 15 




E. S. WRIGHT 

GREENHOUSES 


/ILGRIM SdUIL 1 

<^p rZwrnouM/i. JjxnjfMt U/utq SXo%l W 

.,^/. k)a£g\£fn/ 6qencifr> Mm 1 


Flowers for All Occasions 
Telegraph Delivery Service 






Compliments of 
A FRIEND 



cJhe LPii/mouth I lattonal {Joarik 



PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 




CHECKING ACCOUNTS 

Commercial Personal "Checkmaster" 

BUSINESS and PERSONAL LOANS 

TRUST DEPARTMENT 

American Express Travellers Checks 



Compliments 
of 

MALAGUTI BROS. 



Compliments of 



SWIFT MOTOR SALES, Inc. 





pRAZER felSEB 

Water St. Tel. 1800 

PLYMOUTH 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

PLYMOUTH SHOE HOSPITAL 

63tt Main Street 
PLYMOUTH, MASS. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 
THE OLD COLONY DAIRY BAR 


Best Wishes to the Class of '49 

TAUB'S MARKET 

27 Summer St 


THE ROGERS PRINT 

Complete Printing Service 
20 Middle St Plymouth, Mass. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

JAY'S ARMY & NAVY STORE 

42 Main St. Ext. 
Plymouth Tel. 337 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

MARY'S BEAUTY 
SHOP 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

GINO'S SERVICE 
STATION 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

SEARS FUEL 
COMPANY 


LEONORE'S BEAUTY SALON 

Marjorie Baker, Prop. 

46 Main St Plymouth 
Phone 1116 


GAMBINI'S 

AIR-CONDITIONED 

LUNCHEONETTE 

Tel. 372 52 Main St 


LARRY'S 
RADIO TELEVISION SERVICE 

Old Colony Theatre Bldg. 
Tel. PLY. 965 


TOWN SQUARE TAXI 

FOR IMMEDIATE 
TAXI SERVICE 

Charlie Brewster Telephone 1325 


WOOD'S FISH MARKET 

H. G. Torrance, Prop. 

Fresh Salted and Smoked Fish 

Crabmeat, Scallops, Lobsters, 

Oysters and Clams 

TELEPHONE 261 


CLOUGH'S MARKET 

Tel. 459 84 Summer St. 


C. PAUL 

For your 
Shoes and Repairing 

Honest Values — Dependable Service 

52 Court St. PLYMOUTH 

1 


Established 1927 
MITCHELL - THOMAS CO. 

HOME FURNISHINGS 

Simmons Bedding - Armstrong Linoleum 

Tontine Washable Window Shades 

Frigidaires, Refrigerators 

Opposite Pilgrim Hall — Plymouth 



Best Wishes to Class of '49 

BAILEY MOTOR SALES, Inc. 

Telephone 1090 
BUICK and PONTIAC SALES and SERVICE 

A Reliable Place to Trade . . . One of the best equipped 
Service Stations in the vicinity . . . Agents in Delco 
Batteries and United States Tires. 



DON'T FORGET: All of Our Repair Work 
Is Guaranteed 



114 Sandwich Street 



-n- 



Plymouth, Mass. 



To the Class of 1949 . . 



VERY BEST WISHES 



for a 



SUCCESSFUL FUTURE 



Old Colony 
and Plymouth 
Theatres 



BLISS HARDWARE CO. 

Builder — Marine — Hardware 

Electrical Appliances 

Locksmiths 

Pittsburgh Paints & Glass 

PLUMBING & HEATING 
Sheet Metal Work 

Tel. 825 

(Opp. Old Colony Theatre) 



Compliments of 


CURREERS'S 


CANTONI COAL CO. 


RESTAURANT 


Blue Coal — Soft Coal 




Range and Fuel Oil 


and 


Iron Fireman Automatic Coal 
Stokers and Oil Burners 


ICE CREAM SHOP 


Phone 1233-R 


WHITMAN and KEMP PRODUCTS 


Hedge Road No. Plymouth 


63 Main St. Plymouth 


Compliments 


JLortngs 


of 


Jewelers 


A. K. FINNEY 


KEEPSAKE Diamonds 
HAMILTON — ELGIN — WALTHAM 




28 Main St. Plymouth 


Compliments 




of 


NICKERSON OIL CO. 




RANGE and FUEL OIL 


BARBIERI'S MARKET 




Jabez Corner Tel. 258 


Telephone 580-W 


• 
Quality Meats & Groceries 


234 Sandwich St. Plymouth 


COOPER DRUG CO. 




Incorporated 


THE HOBSHOLE HOUSE 


Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 


Good Lodging and Good Eating 


DRUGS — CANDY — CIGARS 




TOBACCO 
HENDRIE'S ICE CREAM 


212 Sandwich St. Tel. 1153-W 


(In Seven Flavors) 


Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. O'Neill 


In Drugs — If It's Rexall — It's Right 








Compliments of 



American Woolen Co. 



-D- 



PURITAN MILLS 



■ 



VStft 



Nook Farm Dairy 



Alt Of «V ) 

PUPILS AR£ [ 

MJLK-WI5C | 



<~~ t 




MILK 



and 



CREAM 



HEALTH BUILDER 



LOCAL MILK 



Nook Road 



Plymouth 



Telephone PLYMOUTH 1261 



Plymouth Federal 
Savings and Loan Association 



■ 



Incorporated 1882 

JAMES R. CHANDLER 
President 



Federalized 1937 



ROBERT J. TUBBS 
Vfce-President - Treasurer 



W ALDER J. ENGSTROM 
Secretary and Assistant Treasurer 








tor your 



The sign 
of Safety 



SAFETY jfiAAi 

•then consider profit! 



UJe provide proved safety for 
your savings plus the highest 
earnings consistent with safety. 



>i 



Call or Write for Information 



44 Main Street 



Plymouth, Massachusetts 
Tel. 324 



H. A. BRADFORD 




Distributor for 


KAY'S CUT-RATE 


S. S. PIERCE 


Lowest Prices 'in Town 


Specialties 


PATENT MEDICINES 




COSMETICS 


1 Warren Ave. Plymouth 






Corner North St. 67 Main St. 


Telephone 1298-W 




DEXTER'S SHOE STORE 




Footwear for 


PIONEER FOOD STORE 


THE ENTIRE FAMILY 




Tel. 165-W 16 Court St. 


40 Court St. 


E. M. WOOD 

STUDEBAKER 


STEIN'S 

FURNITURE STORE 




Tel. 679 


SOUTH STREET GARAGE 


291-295 Court St. Plymouth 


Tel. Kingston 2183 Nights 8721 


COMPLIMENTS 


L. E. BOUCHARD 


OF 


PLUMBING, HEATING 


KINGSTON RECAPPING CO. 


and WATER PUMPS 
64 Summer St. Kingston, Mass. 


Second Brook St. Tel. 405 


Authorized 


DAVISON - DENNET 


SALES FORD SERVICE 


SAWMILL, Inc. 




Brookdale Avenue Kingston, Mass. 


HERRICK AUTO SALES 


Telephone Kingston 747 


Duxbury Tel. 95 


LUMBER 


ELIZABETH M. FOSTER 


COMPLIMENTS 


BEAUTY SHOP 


OF 


Room 10 Buttner Bldg. 


BUSSOLARI'S NATION-WDDE 


PLYMOUTH 


MARKET 


COMPLIMENTS 


COMPLIMENTS 


OF 


OF 


CAPPANNARI BROS. 


REGINALD MAROIS 



PETROLEUM SALES and SERVICE, Inc. 

Agents for 

FILTERED RANGE and FUEL OILS 

WHITE FLASH GASOLINE 

ATLANTIC HIGH FILM STRENGTH MOTOR OILS 

Hedge Road Plymouth 

Tel. 1499 



Compliments 
of 

SCUDDER COAL & OIL CO. 



Compliments of 



M & M SPORTING GOODS CO. 



Tel. 1915 



14 Middle St. 



Compliments 
of 

PADOVANPS PHARMACY 

289 Court St. 

Plymouth, Mass. 

Tel. 1789 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

DUTTON MOTOR CAR CO. 

115 Sandwich Street 
PLYMOUTH 



OLDSMOBILE 



CADILLAC 



S ADO MI'S 

'/oshion (enler 

Shows the Newest in 
Misses' and Women's Wear 



COMPLIMENTS OF 
MIDDLE ST. MOTORS 

NASH SALES & SERVICE 



Compliments 
of 

PLYMOUTH AUTO BODY 



PLYMOUTH MEN'S SHOP 

Wm. R. Cavicchi 

• Manhattan Shirts 

• Leopold Morse Clothes 

• Gramery Park Clothes 

• Adams & Mallory Hats 

• Hole Proof & Esquire Hose 

SUPERBA NECKWEAR 




ICE CREAM 

"Made for Particular People" 

SOLD EXCLUSIVELY AT THE 
PLYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL CAFETERIA 



131 Eliot Street 



Milton 87, Mass. 



Bluehills 8-7850 



10% Nelson Street Plymouth, Mass. 

Plymouth 160 



COMPLIMENTS OF 




FIVE CENTS 
SAVINGS BANK 

INCORPORATED /8SS 

PLYMOUTH MASSACHUSETTS 



THE LEYDEN PRESS 



PRINTERS and LITHOGRAPHERS 



9 Town Square 



Plymouth, Mass. 



Telephone 775 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



George Mabbett & Sons 

Company 



PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 



<mf*& 



PLYMOUTH SUPPLY CO. 


CAtftflW^ 


PLUMBING & HEATING 

Paint and Hardware Supplies 

Tel. 1423 39 Court St. 


2 STORES 
PLYMOUTH 


Plymouth, Mass. 


NORTH PLYMOUTH 




Compliments of 


LEWIS 


HENRY'S FURNITURE Co. 

HENRY BUSI, Prop. 


Paints - Wallpapers - Dry-Goods 
13-15 Court St. - Plymouth, Mass. 


• Westinghouse 

• Crosley Refrigerators 
• Radio Appliances 
Linoleum - Asphalt & Rubber Tile 

40 Court St. Plymouth 
Tel. 1118 


"That Distinctive Store of Plymouth" 


CECCARELLI 


GEORGE V. BUTTNER 
STORE 

Plymouth's Most Modern Store 


Tailors — Cleansers — Storage 

We Call and Deliver 


For Ladies, Misses and Children 
Tel. 290 19-21 Court St. 


301 Court St. Tel. 941 


PLYMOUTH 


No. Plymouth 




COMPLIMENTS OF 




PLYMOUTH & BROCKTON 
ST. RAILWAY CO. 


VALENTE BROS. 


109 Sandwich St. Plymouth 


— FLORISTS — 

No. Plymouth Tel. 801-W 


TEL. 378 


TIP TOP STORE 

35 South Street 




PLYMOUTH, MASS. 




Otto Sayre Tel. 710 








Good Quality at Just Prices 


PERRY'S MARKET 




Meats, Groceries & Provisions 


KNIFE'S 




Groceries Meats 




Vegetables Fruits 


200 Standish Ave. 
Plymouth, Mass. Tel. 124 


298 Court St. Plymouth 
Telephone 1286 


PARK AVE. SERVICE STA. 

John L. Gallerani 


ZANELLO 
FURNITURE CO. 


SOCONY - VACUUM Products 


NORGE APPLIANCES 


Cor. Park & Court Sts. 


84 Court St. 


Phone 1550 


Plymouth, Mass. 




PLYMOUTH ROCK 


PLYMOUTH ROCK 


CLEANERS 


HARDWARE CO. 


"The Place with Parking Space" 


Tel. 950 


Water St. - Opp. State Pier 


62 Court St. Plymouth 


Phone 1744 




JACK OTTINO -- ALFRED VOLTA 




Compliments 


Compliments 


of 


of 




MAYFLOWER SEA FOODS 


PLYMOUTH ROCK 




BOWLING ALLEYS 



■ 



WM 



% 



IB 

■ 



Hardware 



Plumbing 



JOHN E. JORDAN CO. 



Plymouth, Massachusetts 



Tel. 2 83 



Heating 



Sporting Goods 



IF YOU WANT GOOD 
FRAPPES STOP AT . 



MAYER'S CANDY STORE 



Compliments 
of 

PEPSI-COLA 
KIST BEVERAGES 

and 
O-SO GRAPE 



Plymouth, Mass. 



Tel. 863 



SHIRETOWN MOTORS INC. 



SALES 



&vrv£> 



SERVICE 



Water Street 



Phone 1407 



Plymouth 



To The High School Graduate of 1949, We Extend Our 
Heartiest Congratulations and Best Wishes. 



May he meet the challenge of the future with 
a strong mind and stout heart. 



And may he enjoy the fruits of democracy in 
a world free of tyranny and intolerance. 










v 



MP 



PLYMOUTH CORDAGE COMPANY 



PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 






Bb Bra 

■3VBUI 



BEST WISHES 



to 



THE CLASS OF 1949 

EDES MANUFACTURING 
COMPANY 



Plymouth, Mass. 



Compliments of 



EGAN CHEVROLET CO. 



120 Sandwich St. 
PLYMOUTH 



PARTS • SALES • SERVICE 



PURITAN CLOTHING CO. 

"The Men's and Boys' Store of Plymouth" 



□ 

PURITAN TAILORING DEPT. 

TAILORS — CLEANERS — FURRIERS 



K^oodiag s 

Jewelers 

Established 1802 

DIAMONDS WATCHES JEWELRY 

Sterling Silver, Electrical Appliances 

Clocks, and Gifts 

EXPERT CLOCK and WATCH REPAIRING 

Telephone 429 18 Court Street 

PLYMOUTH 



MARVELLPS 

NEWS STAND 

299 Court St. No. Plymouth 


PLYMOUTH 
PAINT & WALLPAPER 

44 COURT STREET 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

OLD COLONY LAUNDRY 

OF PLYMOUTH 

Master Launderers — Dry Cleaners 
18 Howland St. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

BILLY WALSH'S MARKET 

54 Court St. Tel. 1259 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

PRINCE ST. SERVICE STATION 

Corner of Court and Prince Sts. 

HENRY STEFANI, Prop. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

CONTENTE'S SHOE STORE 


COMPLIMENTS OF 
THE 

HOMESTEAD RESTAURANT 

Junction of 3 & 3A 
Kingston, Mass. 


BEST WISHES 

TO THE CLASS OF '49 

THE YARN SHOP 


TOWN BROOK SERVICE STATION 

MANDO 

14 Water Street Plymouth, Mass. 

Tel. 820-W 

"24 Hour Wrecker Service" 
Mack Sales and Service 


PURITAN GARAGE 

Sgarzi Bros. 

LINCOLN AND MERCURY 

Sales and Service 

Plymouth, Mass. Tel. 260 



■ 







Congratulations 

and the "Best of Luck" 



REDDY KILOWATT 

Your Electric Servant 



PLYMOUTH COUNTY ELECTRIC COMPANY 



THIS MARK 



DESIGNED S PRINTED 




MKO l«]> 



Is your guarantee of . . . 
SATISFACTORY work by 

a 12 5 year old firm financ- 
ially strong with a record of 
Successful performance. 



See Us for 

GENERAL ELECTRIC 
HEATING 



WIRT BROS. CO. 



SOUTH DUXBURY 



Bay Rd. 



Dux. 108-W 



AUTO SUPPLIES 



BICYCLES 



WESTERN AUTO ASSOCIATE STORE 

C. F. FOWLER (Owner) 

10 Main Slreel, PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



TRUETONE RADIOS 



DAVIS TIRES 






Compliments of 

DANIEL J. CALLAHAN 

Finest Granite Memorials 
of All Kinds 

Tel. 1738 



142 Summer St. 



Plymouth, Mass. 



Best Wishes to The Class of 1949 

EDAVILLE RAILROAD 



SOUTH CARVER 




MASS. 



'Join The Happy Throngs" 

MR. & MRS. ELLIS D. ATWOOD 



Compliments of 

THE ARTHUR L. ELLIS CO. 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



NEW YORK 



BOSTON 



CHICAGO 



w:m 



PERSONALIZED PORTRAITS 

and it's all done with 
LIGHTS! 



There's magic in lights . . . add a light here, place a spot- 
light there, and your portrait takes on the appearance of real 
form and individuality. 

Your Vantine photographer knows how lighting effects can 
be best used. . . . How easily they can reflect your person- 
ality. 

Your Vantine photographer knows best how to secure the 
sharply etched photograph your engraver desires of the im- 
portant senior year. . . . The victories of the athletic teams. 
. . . The brilliance of social occasions. . . . The Prom . . . 
The plays. . . . The debates. . . . The expression of every- 
day life on the campus. 

That personalized portraits by Vantine are important is at- 
tested to by the fact that over 300 schools and colleges re- 
peatedly entrust their photographic work to Vantine. 

CrflCIAL PH€TCGRAPHEE 

WARREN KAY VANTINE STUDIO 

132 Boylston Street 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Extra-curricular 



PILGRIM STAFF 

FIRST ROW: Virginia Holmes, Barbara Keay, June Fish, Jane Hilton, Rollene 

Waterman, Webster Dyer, Susanne Taub, Mr. Roland Holmes, Shirley Knight, 

Virginia Patturelli, Marjorie Marois, Joan Thomas, Rita Anderson. 
SECOND ROW: Audrey Calzolari, Lillian Almeida, Beverly Carton, Joan Grosser, 

John Hebard, Clark Griffith, Charles Stewart, Lorraine Monti, Sylvia Corsini, Joan 

Vandini, Jeanette Doten, Barbara McMahon. 
THIRD ROW: Constance Paul, Carol Nemec, Roseanne Rosetti, Joan Neri, Pauline 

Schiel, Janet Sturtevant, Louise Gavoni, Violet Pinto, Betty Landers, Ruth Wall, 

Jacqueline Boyer, Claire Stratton, Andree Straker. 
FOURTH ROW: Dolores Brenner, Beatrice Gibbs, Frances Halunen, David Pyle, Jack 

Tubbs, Robert Saunders, Richard Darsch, Howard Penn, Charlotte Billings, Ann 

Hathaway, Sally Kruegar, Ellen MandelL 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES SOCIETY 

FRONT ROW: Marjorie Marois, Barbara Roncarati, Claire Stratton, Carol Nemec, 

Sec'y; Robert Saunders, President; Shirley Knight, V. Pres.; Joan Thomas, Kathryn 

Gordon, Barbara McMahon. 
SECOND ROW: Beverly Weston, Miss Mary Connolly, Miss Nellie Locklin, Mrs. Lydia 

Gardner, Miss Jeanette Jacques, Susanne Taub, Barbara Keay, June Fish. 
THIRD ROW: John Pinto, Chester Bagni, Henry Savi, Marcia Williams, Dolores 

Brenner, Louise Gavoni, Roland Bolduc, David Priestly. 
FOURTH ROW: Allan Bagni, Alton Morisi, Richard Burgess, David Hogan, Herbert 

Finnegan, Richard Tassinari, Albert Stewart, Webster Dyer, Richard Darsch. 



PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB 

FRONT ROW: Joan Borgatti, Beverly Gonsalves, Nancy Eldridge, Beverly Carton, 
Mr. Claiborne Young, June Fish, Barbara Keay, Leon Johnson, Laura Spencer, 
Jacqueline Smith. 

SECOND ROW: Clark Griffith, Franklin Bassett. 

THIRD ROW: Jack Tillson, Donald Avery, Richard Martinelli, John Hebard, David 
Pyle, David Priestley. 

PRESS CLUB 

SEATED: Theresa Gallerani, Ruth Wall, Miss Ellen M. Downey, Thomas Barnes. 
STANDING: Claire Stratton, Andree Straker, Wayne Terry, Louise Gavoni, Marjorie 
Marois, Joan Borgatti. 

C.A.F. COMMITTEE 

FRONT ROW: Virginia Holmes, David Pyle, Jane Hilton, Miss Elizabeth Kelly, 
Barbara Keay, Clark Griffith, Beverly Carton, Richard Darsch. 

SECOND ROW: Barbara McMahon, Kathryn Gordon, Jane Clough, Sally Krueger, 
Beverly Weston, Carmella Izzo, Marjorie Marois, Marilyn Savery. 

THIRD ROW: Barbara Roncarati, Roland Bolduc, Richard Burgess, Alton Morisi, 
Donald Avery, Louise Gavoni, Rollene Waterman. 



DRAMATIC CLUB 

FRONT ROW: Rita Anderson, June Fish, Carol Nemec, Rollene Waterman, Mrs. 

Alice Urann, Andree Straker, Gloria Cordeiro, Audrey Billings, Jacqueline Boyer. 
SECOND ROW: Joan Grosser, Mary Ellen Gault, Mary Lodi, Beverly Lauterbach, 

Charlotte Billings, Susanne Taub, Patricia Lovett, Carol Springer, Priscilla Johnson, 

Virginia Patturelli. 
THIRD ROW: Robert Borsari, Herbert Finnegan, Ellen Mandell, Adelaide Souza, 

Marcia Williams, Robert Saunders, Thomas Barnes. 



LIBRARY STAFF 

FRONT ROW: Gloria Correa, Dolores Fontes, Joan Vandini, Beverly Gonsalves, 

Rollene Waterman, Marcia Williams, Mr. Arthur Pyle, Beverly Carton, Kathryn 

Gordon, Nancy Melisse. 
SECOND ROW: Virginia Patturelli, Jane McManus, Clare Donovan, Hilda Costa, 

Carolyn Almeida, Nancy Merritt, Jacqueline Boyer, Mary Leming, Joan Thomas, 
Doris Tavares. 
THIRD ROW: Shirley Knight, Carol Springer, Louise Gavoni, Claire Stratton, 

Susanne Taub, Charlotte Billings, Winifred Wright, Ellen Mandell, Joyce Borghesani, 

Judith Jackson. 

BANK TELLERS 

FRONT ROW: Virginia Patturelli, Nancy Willis, Lillian Almeida, Miss Elizabeth Kelly, 

Nancy Romano, Suzanne Sharkey, Louise David. 
SECOND ROW: Beverly Gonsalves, Betty Landers, Constance Kingman, Ruth Chase, 

Marcia Williams, Nancy Merritt, Claire Stratton. 
THIRD ROW: Richard Darsch, Roy Alsheimer, Rodney Fowler, Robert "Martinelli. 



MIesie 



GLEE CLUB 

FRONT ROW: Marilyn Savery, Suzanne Sharkey, Marjorie Marois, Sylvia Corsini, 
June Fish, Janet Sturtevant, Miss Elizabeth Crook. Barbara Keay, Sandra Wood, 
Jane Hilton, Claire Stratton, Beverly Carton, Doris Youngman. 

SECOND ROW: Barbara McMahon, Frances Smith, Shirley Knight, Joan Vandini, 
Yvonne Cravelho, Marlene Proctor, Virginia Patturelli, Rollene Waterman, Andree 
Straker, Carol Nemec, Joan Neri, Joan Fitzpatrick, Carolyn Cavicchi. 

THIRD ROW: Rita Anderson, Jacqueline Boyer, Nancy Merritt, Patricia Lovett, Joan 
Thomas, Mary Ellen Gault, Cora Glass, Louise Gavoni, Betty Landers, Jane Clough, 
Priscilla Johnson, Eleanor Ruediger, Anna Stefani. 

FOURTH ROW: Adelaide Souza, Susanne Taub, Winifred Wright, Virginia Holmes, 
Ruth Chase, Elizabeth Govoni, Beverly Weston, Marjorie Thomas, Barbara 
Goodreau, Jacqueline Smith, Dorothy MacDonald. 

ORCHESTRA 

FRONT ROW: Jane Clough, Shirley Robbins, Suzanne Sharkey, Mr. John Pacheco, 

Rita Anderson, Barbara Grady, George Martin. 
SECOND ROW: Arthur Morton, Joseph Pinto, Dalton Pratt, Glenn McNeil, Henry 

Govoni, David Hogan, Edward Travers, Alfred Leonardi. 



BAND 

FRONT ROW: Nancy Douyelliez, Helen Burgess, James Cameron, Arthur Morton, Mr. 

John Pacheco, George Martin, David Hogan, Virginia Peck, Patricia Potter. 
SECOND ROW: Robert Traverso, Robert Balboni, Charles Sanderson, Alfred Leonardi, 

Joseph Pinto, Dalton Pratt, Joseph Mondeau, James Kingsley. 
THIRD ROW: John Wood, Edward Travers, Peter O'Brien, Gilbert Duarte, Glenn 

McNeil, Henry Govoni, Richard Malaguti, Arthur Fontes. 



OCTETTE 

FRONT ROW: Joan Thomas, Claire Stratton, Miss Elizabeth Crook, Marjorie Marois, 
Sylvia Corsini. 

SECOND ROW: June Fish, Sandra Wood, Barbara Keay, Jane Hilton, Janet Sturtevant. 






LITHO ■ LEYDEN PRESS - PLYMOUTH. MASS 



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